1970s: Metal fabricating finds its footing The FABRICATOR STAMPING Journal The Welder The Tube and Pipe Journal The FABRICATOR en Español The Additive Report The FABRICATOR The Welder The Tube and Pipe Journal STAMPING Journal The Additive Report The FABRICATOR en Español

The FABRICATOR began life as a newspaper-style publication in January 1971. (The July/August 1973 edition is shown.) The reader got the latest in metal fabricating technology news and ink stains on their fingers. If you lived through the 1970s, you’ll recall disco music, pointy-collared shirts, big automobiles, and record inflation. It was a decade that wasn’t so much easy to remember, but more like hard to forget. If you worked in metal fabricating in the 1970s, however, you might look back at these years with some fondness, polyester leisure suits aside. Many elements of modern-day fabricating appeared on the scene during this time, and over the next three decades, the technologies and trends adopted would grow, many becoming integral parts to all sorts of metal manufacturing. The pages of The FABRICATOR, which the fledgling Fabricating Machinery Association, the forerunner of The Fabricators & Manufacturers Association (FMA), launched in 1971, has covered this evolution over the past 50 years. Those early issues of the magazine—which originally was published six times per year—dedicated much of its content to coil processing, roll forming, and stamping, all processes asso...

Plano created a new system for storage with the New Edge Series. The first thing people

Plano created a new system for storage with the New Edge Series. The first thing people will notice is the new latching system that locks down extremely well at the front edge of the box, even when you only have on hand free.  The box is made of a rigid plastic and the edge is hinged with stainless steel hardware. The make several boxes for both all-purpose storage as well as boxes like the Jig and Bladed Jig Box that allows you store jigs in a custom, easily visible and accessible manner that is completely waterproof. I filled the box up as soon as I got it with flipping jigs, casting jigs, football jigs, swim jigs, bladed swim jigs and finesse jigs. You can see where each one is by size, color and design before you even open the lid. You slide the head of the jig between two posts and it holds them in place where the weed guards won’t get bent and warped.  That’s one of the biggest problems with throwing your jigs in a regular box, is that the other heads can malform the weed guard on your jigs. With this box you stand each jig up and they are easy to see, grab and go. The Plano Edge Jig Box is heavy duty, although I think if you dropped it from a distance onto a h...